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KENZI SHIOKAVA takes his materials from nature and seeks to bring out the spiritual essence and presence inherent in such materials. Using discarded wood--railroad ties, telephone poles, beams and other woods shaped by the elements- he creates a form not by imposing a preconceived configuration but by interacting within the structure so that the medium’s own life history becomes the determinant of the final form. Born and raised in Brazil, Kenzi attended Chouinard Art School and Otis Art Institute, where he received his Master of Fine Arts degree. He has participated in solo and group shows throughout the LA area, including the Watts Towers Arts Center Gallery in 1994, and was featured in the 4th Pyong Taek International Art Camp in Korea, the International Art Festival in Tahikawa, Japan and the Art Space One inaugural show in Ito, Japan, and is in the permanent collection of the Watts Towers Arts Center.

RESUME

 

"Archeology makes the mind wonder and bring an appealing emotion as well as understanding, and an indelible mystery of presence. From it’s very process I find inspiration. For any discarded material that has gone through the process of history and humanization is the potential of presence, not only physical but also spiritual. I feel in them the mystery of history and seek to bring out the spiritual essence and presence inherent in such materials. I use discarded wood, railroad ties, telephone poles, beams and other woods shaped by the elements and living things in the environment, and strive to work these materials without losing their natural qualities and vitality. To create a form not by imposing a preconceived configuration but by interacting within the structure so that the medium’s own life history becomes the determinant of the final form. To execute the sculptures hand tools are used. I feel that to develop these materials in this manner it is impossible to go at a machine pace. One has to feel its growth at its own pace. It is essential to feel nature’s vitality and endowments. Being a humanist, my art is deeply rooted in that sense, in all its wholeness and integrity. It evolves from my spirituality, and essence of the approach is freedom of spirit. I strive to keep each work as natural as the medium itself yet to exist in another real, exuding and spirituality. Such as in the “Thunder Silence” of Zen."

                   

                                                                                                                                                                                            Kenzi Shiokava

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